What Ancient Egyptians Can Teach Us About Balance of the Sexes

I Want My Mummy!

Interestingly enough, ancient Egypt did have some roots in matriarchal living.  Akhenaton, the recently discovered father of Tutankhamun (as proved through DNA samples), tried to bring this ancient teaching back during his reign — which was short, only lasting 16 years — and did  so until his untimely death and the orders of the new pharaoh wiped out any mention of its existence, knocking down temples and palaces and using the rubble to build new sites, re-establishing the old religions.

Akhenaton (or Amenhotep IV, 18th Dynasty) is also said to have been the predecessor of modern monotheism, the belief in only one God — Aten.

Back to Egyptian Matriarchy

What I love about this concept is that it is not the extreme sway from a male-dominated society to a female-dominated one, no — it is the balance between the two.  The divine counternance of yin and yang.

In many of the statues, the women is depicted with her hand on the mans shoulder.  This  is alleged to symbolize that he belongs to her, a kind of ‘ownership’. The Happeh Theory suggests that this has got to do with energy or the ‘chi’ of the yin/yang principle — a linked energy.

The wigs that the Pharaohs/Rulers wore also have an interesting theory.  When a Pharaohs wig became longer (leaning towards looking more feminine) it denoted that he was a more balanced, wise and spiritual leader — it was a high rank bestowed upon him.  They clearly revered their women and the part a women has to play in balance.

Photo (Egyptian Family) taken by my grandfather, Harry Roe, during his service in Egypt in WW2.

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Painting the Windows of the Soul — Eyes

Look into my Eyes

There is nothing more captivating than looking into the eyes of a living creature.  So much can be said without words when you look into someone or somethings eyes.

They are said to be the windows of the soul and for good reason — eyes are so expressive.  And it is every artists desire to captivate the onlooker, with a pair of fixating eyes.

“Sometimes I could swear I see the eyes ‘flicker’ or move.  He says I definitely ensnared a bit of his soul in there.”

Look at the Mona Lisa — her eyes follow you around the room.  What a fantastic genius Leonardo was!

Below, you will find a painting of my husband — this one really creeps both of us out a bit.  It is hanging in our bedroom and it is so much like Mike that we both feel it has a certain ‘Dorian Gray’ feel to it.  Sometimes I could swear I see the eyes ‘flicker’ or move.  He says I definitely ensnared a bit of his soul in there.

The Egyptians and Kohl

The ancient Egyptians used to burn Frankincense and make kohl from the ash using water.  They would then paint it around their eyes,  supposedly because they wanted to carry the protection of the Gods with them — most likely a tribute to the God Horus.  Very interesting to ‘frame’ your eyes.  They seemed to think it was an important feature, enough to highlight it anyway.

Back to the Art…

Here are some of my paintings that have the ‘captivating eyes’ theme:

Thanks for looking!

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‘Divine You — Redefining Love in the New Earth’ is now out at all leading bookstores worldwide — don’t forget to order your copy: